מינילנד 2009
Image of EDUARD 1/48 PROIPACK FW190A-8 8173

EDUARD 1/48 PROIPACK FW190A-8 8173

$71.00 - On sale

highly accurate static display model
HIGH QUALITY
HIGH DETAIL kit

The second half of the Second World War saw the Focke-Wulf Fw190, in its various forms, emerge as the best of what was available to the Luftwaffe. The dedicated fighter version was a high
performance, heavily armed machine. Its development had a precarious beginning, against a 1938 specification issued by the Technishes Amt, RLM. The first prototype took to the air on June 1,
1939. After a series of improvements and even radical changes, the design culminated in the fall of 1940 in the pre-series version Fw190A-0 to the tune of twenty-eight pieces. Six of these were
retained by the test unit Erprobungsstaffel 190 at Rechlin, which was tasked with conducting service trials. These revealed a wide range of flaws to the point where the RLM halted further
development. Despite this, on the basis of urgings from the test unit staff, the aircraft was not shelved. After a series of some fifty modifications, the RLM gave the go ahead for the Fw190 to be
taken into inventory of the Luftwaffe. In June, 1941, the Luftwaffe accepted the first of 100 ordered Fw190A-1s, armed with four 7.9mm MG17s. By September, 1941, II/JG 26 was completely
equipped with the type, operating on the Western Front. November saw the production of the next version Fw190A-2, powered by a BMW801C-2, and armed with two 7.9mm MG17s and two
MG151s of 20mm caliber in the wings. Part of this series received an additional pair of 20mm MG FFs, thus attaining an armament standard of later types.Asignificant advancement to the design
came in the spring of 1942, when the BMW801D-2 became available, who´s installation gave birth to the Fw190A-3. July saw the development of the improved A-4. Both were armed with what
became the standard two fuselage mounted MG17s, two wing mounted MG151 cannon, and two MG FF cannon, placed inboard of the wheel wells. During 1942, production had intensified, and a
production facility was set up under license at Fieseler. Thanks in part to this, production rose in 1942 to 1,878 units as opposed to 224 in 1941. Large-scale production of the A-5 was initiated in
April, 1943, with an identical wing to theA-4, but with a nose extension that would become standard on all subsequent Fw-190A versions up to theA-9, and also on the corresponding F types. July
saw the development of a new, strengthened wing, which incorporated MG151s instead of the MG FFs in the outer position. The adoption of this wing developed theA-6 version. Further changes
developed the A-7, produced during the end of 1943. This version came about with the replacement of the fuselage mounted MG17s with 13mm MG131s. Further improvements led to the
Fw190A-8, and this version became the most widely produced with some 1400 units made. The most significant change to this variant was the installation of the GM-1 nitrous-oxide injection
system, for temporary power boost in combat. A portion of A-8 production was built as the A-8/R2 and A-8/R8, armed with MK108 cannon in the outer wing location, and with armoured slabs
added to the cockpit sides and a modified canopy. The final production version of the BMW801 powered fighter was the Fw190A-9, equipped with the BMW801TS of 2000hp (1470kW). There
was a parallel development of these fighter optimized aircraft with a dedicated fighter-bomber version, the Fw190F. These aircraft had reduced wing armament to two MG151 cannon in the
wingroot position. The engine was optimized for low level operation, and the armament options varied to satisfy the ground attack role, including bombs of various weight classes and a variety of
anti-tank rockets. This branched into the extended range Fw190G version. Development of the thoroughbred fighter continued in the guise of the Fw190D, which began to reach Luftwaffe units in
the second half of 1944, and was the result of mounting an in-line Jumo213A-1 engine into a modified Fw190A-8 airframe. Although the Fw190 never achieved the widespread usage of the
competing Bf109, its contribution to the German Air Force was certainly significant through the second half of WWII. Fw190s saw service on the Western Front as well as in the East. As heavy
fighters with imposing firepower, they found themselves integral components, from 1943 onwards, within the units tasked with the protection of the Reich from the ominous clouds of allied fourengined bombers. This is where the A-8 version was instrumental, along with it´s A-8/R2 armoured development. This version, with its firepower, was a very ominous and daunting foe for the
bomber crews. From the second half of 1944, their danger was kept in check to a degree by escorting P-47s, and necessitated the development of the P-51 Mustang.

General characteristics

Crew: One
Length: 8.95 m (29 ft 4 in)
Wingspan: 10.506 m (34 ft 6 in)
Height: 3.15 m (10 ft 4 in)
Wing area: 18.3 m2 (197 sq ft)
Airfoil: root: NACA 23015.3; tip: NACA 23009[68]
Empty weight: 3,200 kg (7,055 lb)
Gross weight: 4,417 kg (9,738 lb)
Max takeoff weight: 4,900 kg (10,803 lb)
Fuel capacity: 639 l (141 imp gal; 169 US gal)
Powerplant: 1 × BMW 801D-2 14-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine 1,700 PS (1,677 hp; 1,250 kW) and up to 1,980 PS (1,953 hp; 1,456 kW) at 1.65 ata for up to 10 minutes of emergency power[69][37]
Propellers: 3-bladed constant-speed propeller
Performance

Maximum speed: 652 km/h (405 mph, 352 kn) at 5,920 m (19,420 ft)
Range: 900–1,000 km (560–620 mi, 490–540 nmi)
Combat range: 400–500 km (250–310 mi, 220–270 nmi)
Ferry range: 900–1,000 km (560–620 mi, 490–540 nmi) ~1800-2000 km with droptank.
Service ceiling: 10,350 m (33,960 ft)
Rate of climb: 15 m/s (3,000 ft/min)
Wing loading: 241 kg/m2 (49 lb/sq ft)
Power/mass: 0.29–0.33 kW/kg (0.18–0.20 hp/lb)
Armament
Guns:
2 × 13 mm (0.51 in) synchronized MG 131 machine guns
2 × 20 mm (0.79 in) MG 151/20 E cannons, synchronized in the wing roots
2 × 20 mm (0.79 in) MG 151/20 E cannons in mid-wing mounts
Bombs: 1 bomb under fuselage or four bombs under wings.

Content
1 FULL MODEL 1/48
3 tires
1 NOSE
1 FUSELAGE
1 COCKPIT
1 COCKPIT FLOOR
2 LOWER WING
1 UPPER WING
2 MAIN WING
1 NOZZLE
2 CANOPY
1 SEATS
1 FULL ENGINE 25 PARTS
BMW 801 D-2 or the 801Q (also known as 801TU). The 801Q/TU

1 PROPELLER
2 W.GR.21 ROCKETS
2 LANDING GEAR
+
40 PE DETAIL PARTS
+
1 MASK

Scale
1/48

Edition
Profipack

Type
Aircraft

Manufacturer
Eduard

Marking options:

Blue '13', Maj. Walter Dahl, Stab/JG 300, Jüterborg, Germany – December 1944

With the illustrated aircraft, the later of his two documented Blue '13's, Maj. Walter Dahl took part in combat operations in the Defence of the Reich in 1944, as Kommodore of JG 300. For a time, the plane carried
the emblem of Stab JG 300, a B-17 sillouette in crosshairs. This emblem likely also appeared on the other side of the engine cowl. Although this was in all liklihood without a background, it has been speculated
that this may also have been in a light blue color. The aircraft carries the standard camouflage of RLM 74/75/76 with obvious signs of repair and respraying. This may have included a yellow underside of the
cowling, which at this time was ordered to have been overpainted. The red identification band on the fuselage used in the ID system within the Defence of the Reich may have also been switched later to bluewhite-blue

White '2', Uffz. Julius Händel, IV./JG 54, Poland, August/September, 1944

Uffz. Julius Händel flew this very interestingly painted machine in the service of 13.(10) Staffel JG 54 on the collapsing Eastern Front. It carried a scheme of RLM 74/75/76 with a yellow prop hub, with the yellow
extending to the propeller blades. The Indian emblem on the port side of the fuselage was an identifier for 13.Staffel/JG 54. This aircraft didn’t carry the IV. Gruppe marking on the rear fuselage, and has been
documented without a fuselage rack.
In September, 1944, IV./JG 54 stood down for R and R time at Illesheim, but soon entered combat operations against the Allies when Uffz. Händel lost his life in a dogfight with USAAF Thunderbolts on September
23, 1944 over Kleve/Nimwegen. Two days later, he was awarded the Iron Cross, Second Class…..

Blue '8', 'Erika', IV./JG 5, Herdla, Norway, Spring, 1945

Blue '8' with the name 'Erika' below the cockpit, was one of several Fw 190A-8 that 12.Staffel/JG 5 abandoned at Herdla in Norway after disbanding in the spring of 1945. The aircraft carried RLM 74/75/76
camouflage with a blue cowl ring and spinner denoting its Staffel. The applied Adlerflugel behind the exhausts was for the noted time period uncommon. The JG 5 insignia ’Eismeer‘ on the engine cowl was applied
only on the port side. The aircraft number was repeated on the wheel hub. IV./JG 5 took part in the defence of northern sector of occupied Europe, but was not standardized within the Defence of the Reich system.

White '6'. Lt. Gustav Salffner, 7./JG 300, Lobnitz, Germany, March, 1945

White '6', flown by the CO of 7. Staffel/JG 300, carried the typical camouflage pattern from the closing months of the war. The top surfaces of the fuselage was sprayed RLM 83 that carried over to the side fuselage
color, RLM 76. The top of the wings were covered with RLM 75/83 (perhaps 81/83). JG 300 ID markings in their later form, composed of blue-white-blue rear fuselage stripes, were carried. The emblem consisting
of a unicorn on a red background was a simplified insignia of Salffner’s family. Munich’s Gustav Salffner ended the war with an Iron Cross Second Class and seven confirmed and seven probable victories

Model length: 186mm
Wingspan: 210mm
Plastic parts: 154
PE parts, eduard mask
7 Plastic sprue

COLOURS
GSi Creos (GUNZE)
H 8 C008 SILVER
H 5 C005 BLUE
H 12 C018 FLAT BLACK
H 69 C037 RLM75 GRAY
H 64 C017 RLM71 DARK GREEN
H 70 C060 RLM02 GRAY
H 65 C018 RLM70 BLACK GREEN
H 11 C062 FLAT WHITE
H 13 C003 RED
H 4 C004 YELLOW
H 2 C002 BLACK
H 47 C041 RED BROWN

PAINT AND GLUE ARE NOT INCLUDED

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